A Tale of Two Elections, Tibetan and American

A Tale of Two Elections, Tibetan and American

Bhuchung K. Tsering
January 30, 2016

In February, two elections that I am following closely will take interesting turns. One of them is of course the American presidential elections and the Iowa caucuses of both the Democratic and Republican parties on February 1 might give us a clearer idea of who the likely candidate is or in the case of the Republican Party, whether Donald Trump has any future.
What the caucuses essentially do is to empower the people at the local level to select their choice for presidential candidate and also to appoint their delegates that will take the process to the next level, eventually leading to delegates to the two conventions that will formally select the respective party’s candidate.

The process in the caucuses is not uniform though. In Iowa, the Republicans will have the people write down their choices, while in the case of the Democrats, the people will physically align themselves with groups that support a particular candidate.

So, next week we will have some clarity.

The other election is that of the Tibetans in diaspora. An interesting border-less democracy is in action as the small Tibetan communities in exile, spread over more than 30 countries, is in the process of choosing their Sikyong (political head) and members of the Tibetan Parliament.

Tibetan election is a two stage process and it began in October 2015 when primary elections were held to nominate candidates. In between and before that there have been hectic campaigning, both direct and indirect ones. Now on February 3, the Tibetan Election Commission will announce the list of final candidates. We will then see the campaigning becoming fiercer.
I had the opportunity to watch one of the debates among those vying for the North American seats to the Tibetan Parliament. I am told there will be a debate between the Sikyong candidates soon. One thing is clear: we are slowly seeing a change in the attitude of the candidates; from that of being modest and humble to one of projecting oneself as better than the rest.

This time, social media is an integral part of the campaign vehicles. Of course, Facebook seems to be the preferred medium although I am told there are several WeChat groups that dedicate time and efforts to discussing the potentials of the Sikyong candidates.
American political campaigning is taking a nasty turn currently. I hope the Tibetan campaigning can avoid that while being forthright about differences in positions. The jury is out on that.

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