My Tryst with the Poet Nissim Ezekiel

My Tryst with the Poet Nissim Ezekiel

Bhuchung K. Tsering

I first came to know of Nissim Ezekiel when his poem, Night of the Scorpion, was part of the syllabus in my school.  At that time I was struck by two things; first the simplicity of the language that brought clarity to the message; and secondly the realization that people could survive even after a scorpion sting. Until reading it, I somehow had this understanding that a scorpion sting was always lethal.

Here is a taste of the poem describing the situation just after the scorpion had stung the mother’s toe:

With candles and with lanterns

throwing giant scorpion shadows

on the mud-baked walls

they searched for him: he was not found.

They clicked their tongues.

With every movement that the scorpion made his poison moved in Mother’s blood, they said.

In any case, I read more about Mr. Ezekiel thereafter.  While in college in India in the early 1980s, I reached out to Mr. Ezekiel, both to get his counsel on my personal career as well as to understand his thoughts on Tibetan-Chinese relationship.

He was kind enough to respond, mostly through the familiar Indian postal department’s yellowish postcards.  We even kept a steady communication thereafter; he shared his thoughts about what certain developments on the Tibet front would be seen from the eyes of the international community and also offered space in the Freedom First, a liberal monthly, which he was editing then.

NEzekielBKT1981

Beginning with an article on “The Tragedy of the Tibetan People” in Freedom First’s October 1981 issue, I had the privilege of writing a few articles for the magazine.

freedomfirst1981

Mr. Ezekiel passed away in 2004 and I will always be grateful for the brief period of interaction that I have had with him.

In the years thereafter the liberal group of writers, artists, and scholars in Bombay (now Mumbai) to which Mr. Ezekiel belonged has continued their interest in Tibet, hosting events and raising the awareness among the people there.

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